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Antislavery Poetry from San Francisco

Running man image from workshop poster

The Pacific Appeal was the leading African American newspaper on the West Coast during the early 1860s.  A newly-published set of eight antislavery poems from the journal's inaugural 1862 volume captures the sense of expectancy within the African American community for the imminent end of US slavery.  These poems include the work of James Madison Bell, a San Francisco plasterer, brickmason, and poet.  Read more... 
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Legacies

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This collection addresses the political, social, cultural, and rhetorical legacies of the US antislavery movement, primarily from the conclusion of the Civil War forward. The collection is co-edited by Holly Kent (Lehigh University), Joe Lockard (Arizona State University), and Zoe Trodd (Harvard University).

An Address Delivered at the Centennial Anniversary of the Pennsylvania Society for Promoting the Abolition of Slavery

An 1875 address delivered by African American abolitionist and writer Frances Ellen Watkins Harper. Digitized by the Antislavery Literature Project.

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Address to the Colored People

An 1867 speech by Robert Ingersoll in Galesburg, Illinois. Digitized by the Antislavery Literature Project.

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America's Past and Future

An 1868 sermon by abolitionist and 'amalgamationist' Bishop Gilbert Haven. Digitized by the Antislavery Literature Project.

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American 'Lynch Law' Murders - in Support of Slavery

An 1835 editorial in the British reform newspaper Morning Herald, from an 1837 volume opposed to capital punishment. Digitized by the Antislavery Literature Project.

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The Barbarous Decision of the United States Supreme Court Declaring the Civil Rights Act Unconstitutional and Disrobing the Colored Race of All Civil Protection. The Most Cruel and Inhuman Verdict Against a Loyal People in the History of the World.

Addresses by Bishop Henry McNeal Turner, Frederick Douglass and Robert Ingersoll against the 1883 US Supreme Court's overturning of the 1875 Civil Rights Act. Digitized by Documenting the American South, University of North Carolina.

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The Coppock Brothers: Heroes of Harper's Ferry

A 1914 essay by US socialist leader Eugene V. Debs. Digitized by the Antislavery Literature Project.

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"Fifty Years (1863-1913)"

A 1913 poem on the Emancipation Proclamation, by African American writer James Weldon Johnson. Digitized by the Antislavery Literature Project.

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Frederick Douglass [Paul Laurence Dunbar]

An 1895 memorial poem by African American poet Paul Laurence Dunbar. Digitized by the Antislavery Literature Project.

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Frederick Douglass [Kelly Miller]

A 1909 essay by African American educator Kelly Miller. Digitized by the Antislavery Literature Project.

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Frederick Douglass [Elizabeth Cady Stanton]

An 1895 public letter on the occasion of Frederick Douglass' death, by suffragist Elizabeth Cady Stanton. Digitized by the Antislavery Literature Project.

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How Boston Received the Emancipation Proclamation

A 1913 description of the 1863 New Year and celebration of the Emancipation Proclamation, by Fanny Villard Garrison. Digitized by the Antislavery Literature Project.

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John Brown [Du Bois]

A 1909 selection from African American writer W.E.B. Du Bois. Digitized by the Antislavery Literature Project.

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John Brown: History's Greatest Hero

A 1907 essay by US socialist leader Eugene V. Debs. Digitized by the Antislavery Literature Project.

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The Lessons of the Hour

An 1894 speech by Frederick Douglass to the Metropolitan African Methodist Episcopal Church in Washington, DC. Digitized by the Antislavery Literature Project.

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Lynch Law in All its Phases

An 1893 address by African American activist and writer Ida B. Wells. Digitized by the Antislavery Literature Project.

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Mob Murder Must Stop

Report of a 1911 anti-lynching speech by Rev. John Haynes Holmes. Digitized by the Antislavery Literature Project.

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Minorities versus Majorities

An essay from Emma Goldman's Anarchism and Other Essays (1917). Digitized by the Antislavery Literature Project.

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The Negro Element in American Life

A 1900 speech by Abraham Lincoln DeMond in Montgomery, Alabama. Digitized by the Antislavery Literature Project.

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The Progress of Colored Women

An 1898 speech by Mary Church Terrell at the National American Woman Suffrage Association convention in Washington, DC. Digitized by the Antislavery Literature Project.

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On the Twenty-First Anniversary of Emancipation

An 1883 address by Frederick Douglass in the Congregational Church, Washington, DC. Digitized by the Antislavery Literature Project.

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Ossawatomie Brown

An 1859-60 essay by Charles Farrar Browne, writing as Artemus Ward. Digitized by the Antislavery Literature Project.

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Prison Labor

An 1899 address by socialist leader Eugene Debs. Digitized by the Antislavery Literature Project.

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Right on the Scaffold, or The Martyrs of 1822

Tract on the Denmark Vesey slave revolt, published in 1901 by Archibald Henry Grimké. Digitized by Documenting the American South, University of North Carolina.

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A Scrap of Curious History

This Mark Twain essay, first published posthumously in Harpers Magazine in 1914, contains a fictional history of abolitionism in a Missouri town. Digitized by the Antislavery Literature Project.

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Sonnets to the Memory of Frederick Douglass

Memorial sonnets for Frederick Douglass by abolitionist Theodore Tilton. Digitized by the Antislavery Literature Project.

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"Then and Now"

A long poem on the history of the antislavery movement, published in 1900 by African American abolitionist, social activist and writer Frances Ellen Watkins Harper. Digitized by the Antislavery Literature Project.

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A Torch for Tomorrow: Civil Rights Protest Literature and the Historical Memory of Abolitionism

A video of an April 2008 talk by Zoe Trodd (Harvard University) on "A Torch for Tomorrow: Civil Rights Protest Literature and the Historical Memory of Abolitionism", at Arizona State University.

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Woman's Rights Tract no. 1: Speech by Wendell Phillips

An 1851 speech by abolitionist Wendell Phillips at the 2nd Woman's Rights Convention, in Worcester, Massachusetts. Digitized by the Antislavery Literature Project.

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